Good Friday (14th April)

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Good Friday

Also known as Black Friday, Holy Friday or Great Friday, Good Friday is a day of utmost significance for Christians, as the day marks the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, wherein he died at Calvary. The day falls in the holy week and is the Friday preceding the Easter Sunday, and according to the Gregorian calendar it is mostly observed in the month of either March or April, with variations existing between the Western Churches and the Eastern Churches. The day is a national holiday in India and all across the world, especially in those nations that are either Catholic or Anglican. Many countries also follow the day with strict rules, such as Germany in Europe, which prohibits people from dancing or going for horse racing on this day, as they believe it to be an insult to the serenity and solemn essence of Good Friday.

On this day, Christians observe a fast and offer prayers, paying tribute to the sacrifice the son of god, Jesus Christ made for everyone’s sins. There’s generally no mass held on Good Friday in Roman Catholic churches, however a list of church services is held from midday at 12 p.m. to around 3 p.m. Many countries like Spain, Italy, India, the Philippines, etc. hold processions on this day and many Christians choose to wear black on Good Friday to commemorate the loss of their god Jesus Christ, and hence show their mourning. An air of sadness surrounds them and they observe the day in silence or solitude other than their prayers and participating in the church services voluntarily.

The main symbol of Good Friday is the Christian cross, also known as the crucifix, on which Jesus Christ was crucified. Many people also choose to make a dull appearance don their house by removing fancy, shiny objects from their houses, as a mark of showing their grief and mourning over Jesus Christ’s death.

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